Contents start


December  1, 1999
High-Sensitivity Optical DNA Assay System
With its fully automated DNA screening, this high-performance system promises definitive diagnosis of infectious diseases threatening human health and welfare
High-Sensitivity Optical DNA Assay System
High-Sensitivity Optical DNA Assay System
Summary
Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. is pleased to announce a new fully automated high-sensitivity optical DNA assay system. The innovation will make vital contributions to screening for infectious diseases.
The project is part of an industrial and scientific R&D program under the auspices of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).
THE NEXT GENERATION
Recent genome analysis has made great progress, and wide-ranging applications are being explored in medicine, basic science and environmental studies. Especially in medicine, there has been a fast-paced effort to bring the techniques to genetic diagnosis, gene therapy and DNA vaccines. The results have been so encouraging that they have prompted high expectations for advanced diagnosis and treatment.
Olympus has a long record of responding to medical needs for clinical testing, diagnosis and treatment. The company's blood analyzers combine sophisticated assay and instrumentation systems, and R&D has shown ways to integrate them with microfabrication technologies.
The goal is a DNA assay system that can prevent viral infections transmitted through blood transfusions. Although immunoassay is the most common method of blood screening, it poses several difficulties. Not only do test results take a relatively long time, but the complex process also requires highly skilled technicians and consumes large quantities of expensive reagents.
The new high-sensitivity optical DNA assay system promises to overcome these drawbacks by bringing the advantages of full automation to blood screening - speed, safety and lower costs. It also has an ultracompact design that takes up less space and enhances operating safety.
Developing a Total Solution
Robotic technologies have been used to combine three components in the fully automated high-sensitivity optical DNA assay system. They include a module for separating and extracting the target DNA from the serum sample, a DNA amplification module and a nonlabeled optical detection module with a Two Reflection Null Comparative Ellipsometer for DNA chips.
DNA Extraction Module
Microfabrication design The free-flow electrophoresis (FFEp) module has an area of 16 cm2 and a depth of 30 & micro; m. It is made of bonded glass sheets with electrodes on both sides of the chamber.
Continuous high-speed extraction After a sample containing DNA and protein is poured into the inlet, electrophoretic force is used for continuous DNA separation and extraction.
DNA Separation/Extraction Module
DNA Separation/Extraction Module
Patterns of Free-Flowing Dyes
Patterns of Free-Flowing Dyes
DNA Amplification Module
Microfabrication design
The micromodule is fabricated from a silicon wafer. It has eight reaction slits with a heating register and a sensor on the back of each one.
High-speed heating and precise temperature control
To speed up amplification, the temperature-change cycle has been shortened, and temperature control is more accurate. Compared to conventional devices, the time required for amplification has been cut to less than a third.
DNA Amplification Module Reaction Chamber
DNA Amplification Module Reaction Chamber
Nonlabeled Optical Detection Module
First DNA chip technologies to employ nonlabeled optical detection
An optical method is used to detect double strands of DNA formed from bonding with the target DNA on a chip. The chip holds two or more DNA probes capable of independent bonding with the DNA in a virus.
Two Reflection Null Comparative Ellipsometer (TRNCE)
The TRNCE system offers positive identification of the specimen. Without affecting its polarity of the laser beam, the prism reflects a laser beam directly back to the reference DNA chip. The ellipsometer detects the hybridized specimen by measuring the divergence in phase contrast resulting from polarization.
Principle and Structure of the TRNCE Ellipsometer
Principle and Structure of the TRNCE Ellipsometer
Two Reflection Null Comparative Ellipsometer (TRNCE)
Two Reflection Null Comparative Ellipsometer (TRNCE)
*Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. was changed to OLYMPUS CORPORATION as of October 1, 2003.
  • Press releases are company announcements that are directed at the news media.
  • Information posted on this site is current and accurate only at the time of their original publication date, and may now be outdated or inaccurate.
  • Company names and product names specified are trademarks of their respective owners.